Longjing green
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Dragon Well

Longjing

15 €

A Sichuan version of longjing – one of China’s oldest and most famous teas, originally grown in the Zhejiang province. The tea offers a pleasant aftertaste that transmutes from neutrally mellow to nutty over the brewing process.

SKU: 0015. Categories: , .

Additional Information

English name:

Dragon Well

Pinyin:

lóngjǐng

Chinese:

龙井

Type and Grade

Excellent-quality green tea.

Name origin:

Long means 'dragon'; jing means 'well'. There is no consensus as to the etymology of longjing. Some legends attribute it to the Longjing Temple where a certain well was dug almost two thousand years ago. Other legends say that a person who was digging that well found a dragon-shaped stone. Still other theories attribute the name to a wiggling ripples of the water in some well after a rainstorm that someone associated with movement patterns of a dragon.

Ingredients:

Buds and leaves of Camellia sinensis.

Harvest year:

2016

Origin:

Sichuan, China

Steeping suggestions:

one serving: 6 grams (0.2oz – about 1 tsp)
water: ~ 80 °C, 100-250 ml (~ 175°F, 3-9oz)
time: 30-60 seconds
number of infusions: 5-6
discard the first brew

Packaging and storage:

We pack our teas in resealable insulated kraft paper bags. Tea should be stored in a cool and dry place. The expiry date is stamped on the bag.

Shipping:

Worldwide with Express Mail Service (EMS tracking) or China Post

Product Description

Dragon Well Green Tea – Longjing

This is a Sichuan version of longjing – one of China’s oldest and most famous teas, originally grown in the Zhejiang province. Longjing has warm autumn notes of chestnuts and a refreshing fragrance of a sea breeze. The tea offers a pleasant aftertaste that transmutes from neutrally mellow to nutty over the brewing process.

Why we like it?

Dragon well tea is quite appealing visually, which makes it perfect material for tea ceremonies. Put some leaves in a high glass, add hot water, and bask in rays of glory as your audience gets carried by the sight of dangling leaves that swell gradually, restoring their pristine form.

Roman’s personal score: 90/100
Miha’s personal score: 91/100

The scores above represent how the Daoli co-founders Miha and Roman feel about each particular tea. The ratings are given on 0 to 100 scale and are absolutely subjective. We simply translate into numbers our first impression about this tea.

General steeping suggestions

Tea can be steeped in a tea pot, gaiwan, or a strainer placed right in your cup. Feel free to experiment with time, temperature, and quantity. If tea feels a bit strong or bitter, just use less leaves or steep it for a shorter period of time.

The purpose of the first brew is to rinse the leaves, so it shouldn’t last more than five seconds and should be discarded. Pour the hot water again. This time, steep it for longer periods. Avoid leaving the leaves soaking in water between brews, because it makes tea taste bitter and steals a lot of its flavor. If used properly, about six grams of tea leaves can yield several middle-size cups of excellent tea.

Chinese people enjoy the original taste of tea, so they never use milk, sugar, or lemon.

Steeping suggestions for Dragon Well Longjing

Start with this, then experiment:

  • one serving: 6 grams (0.2oz – about 1 tsp)
  • water: ~ 80 °C, 100-250 ml (~ 175°F, 3-9oz)
  • time: 30-60 seconds
  • number of infusions: 5-6
  • discard the first brew

Keep infusion time under one minute. Oversteeping this delicate tea may bring out some bitterness.

Zhuye qing

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