guyi yenian chenxiang shu puer
Yubang yuannian chenxiangYubang yuannian chenxiangYubang yuannian chenxiangYubang yuannian chenxiangYubang yuannian chenxiangYubang yuannian chenxiangYubang yuannian chenxiangYubang yuannian chenxiang

Fragrant Vintage

Yuannian Chenxiang Shu Puer

15 €

A blend of Menghai gongting (top-quality) puer processed in 2008 and extra-grade shu puer from 2011. This combination of young and old creates a special flavor with a rich and powerful base and exquisite overtones. It yields a potent dark beverage with a misty smell of freshly cleared woods.

SKU: 0049. Categories: , , .

Additional Information

English name:

Fragrant Vintage

Type and Grade:

Extra grade shu (cooked, ripe, heavily fermented) puer.

Chinese:

远年陈香 (熟普洱)

Pinyin:

yuǎnnián chénxiāng (shú pǔ'ěr)

Name origin:

'yuannian' literally means 'many/endless years' which reflects the fact that this cake contains some fairly old (2008) tea; 'chen' means old and 'xiang' means 'smell' or 'fragrance', which is a traditional Chinese term used to describe fragrance of older types of shu (cooked) puer tea.

Ingredients:

Buds and leaves of Camellia sinensis.

Cake weight:

357 gr.

Harvest year:

2012-2016

Origin:

Yunnan, China

Steeping suggestions:

one serving: 6 grams (0.2 lb)
water: ~ 90 °C, 100-250 ml (~ 195°F, 3-9oz)
time: 30-180+ seconds
number of infusions: 5-7
discard the first brew

Packaging and storage:

We put all puer cakes into resealable plastic bags for extra protection. If stored in a cool and dry place, puer tea will remain drinkable for dozens of years.

Shipping:

Worldwide with Express Mail Service (EMS tracking) or China Post

Product Description

Fragrant Vintage Shu Puer – Yuannian Chenxiang

Fragrant Vintage (yubang yuannian chenxiang) is a blend of Menghai gongting (top-quality) puer processed in 2008 and extra-grade shu puer from 2011. This combination of young and old creates a special flavor with a rich and powerful base and exquisite overtones. It yields a potent dark beverage with a misty smell of freshly cleared woods.

Why we like it?

This tea sports a relatively high (25-30%) chahuang content. Chahuang (茶皇 – tea emperor) are the thick, bright yellow,  half- to one-inch-long buds that occur almost exclusively in top-grade puers. Apart from their visual appeal, these buds make a significant contribution to the overall flavor, adding the complex notes of that lingering sweetness that is characteristic of better quality puer teas. In Chinese language, this “returning sweet” flavor is called huigan.

No aging required. Thanks to the addition of gongting harvested and processed in 2008, Fragrant Vintage already has that savory taste that tea aficionados expect to see in shupu.

This yubang yuannian chenxiang shu puer has a rather neutral taste and pleasant fragrance – good choice for a first encounter with the rich world of cooked puers.

Roman’s personal score: 85/100
Miha’s personal score: 80/100

The scores above represent how the Daoli co-founders Miha and Roman feel about each particular tea. The ratings are given on 0 to 100 scale and are absolutely subjective. We simply translate into numbers our first impression about this tea.

A few words about the manufacturer

Guyi is a relatively young tea manufacturer. They first started to make their own puer tea in 1999. Five years later Jiang Yingbao, the founder, incorporated the firm and registered several trademarks, such as Yubang, and Mijing Yunnan. Now the Guyi tea factory employs around 150 people, has fermentation and storage facilities in Menghai and Kunming, selling around 800 tons of tea annually both domestically and abroad. Some of the tea is grown on their own land in Jingmai and some tea they buy from trusted farmers in that area. Guyi is renowned for their integrity and innovative spirit.

Basic facts about puer

There are two kinds of puer tea: shu (ripe, cooked, heavily fermented) and sheng (raw). Shu puers undergo an extensive (several months to a year) fermentation process, whereas sheng puers are not fermented at all. Shu puers produce dark brown infusions quite similar to black tea. The color of sheng puer tea may range from lime to intense yellow – the spectrum typical of green teas, but that’s where the similarity ends. A typical sheng puer has a pronounced bittersweet flavor and a lingering mellow aftertaste called huigan (回甘) or liugan (留甘) in Chinese.

Some people are discouraged from exploring puer teas because of erroneous perceptions that all puers taste like earth or have other unpleasant qualities. This only applies to low-quality puers that were either made of bad leaves, processed in a wrong way, or stored under inappropriate conditions. Brewed properly, good quality puers may seem unusually strong to an inexperienced palate, but they should not feel disagreeable in any way.

Shu puer tea is often divided into supreme (gongting), extra, 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 7th grades. Sheng puers are sometimes classified into extra, 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th grades, but this system is far from universal. The grade of puer tea is primarily determined by the buds vs. leaves ratio, as well as the size and shape thereof. Supreme-quality shu puer (aka gongting), for instance, is supposed to be buds only with each bud averaging up to one inch in length. Extra class shu is 50-60% buds and 40-50% leaves. First grade shu puer is approximately 30% buds and 70% leaves. Third grade has leaves that are larger in size and the bud content is accidental. Fifth and seventh grades are almost entirely made up of leaves, the main difference being in size, thickness, and texture of tea material used. Shengs follow a similar pattern, but, again, standards vary significantly among manufacturers.

General steeping suggestions

Tea can be steeped in a tea pot, gaiwan, or a strainer placed right in your cup. Feel free to experiment with time, temperature, and quantity. If tea feels a bit strong or bitter, just use less leaves or steep it for a shorter period of time.

The purpose of the first brew is to rinse the leaves, so it shouldn’t last more than five seconds and should be discarded. Pour the hot water again. This time, steep it for longer periods. Avoid leaving the leaves soaking in water between brews, because it makes tea taste bitter and steals a lot of its flavor. If used properly, about six grams of tea leaves can yield several middle-size cups of excellent tea.

Chinese people enjoy the original taste of tea, so they never use milk, sugar, or lemon.

Gongfu steeping suggestions for Fragrant Vintage

Start with this, then experiment:

  • one serving: 6 grams (0.2 lb)
  • water: ~ 90 °C, 100-250 ml (~ 195°F, 3-9oz)
  • time: 30-180+ seconds
  • number of infusions: 5-7
  • discard the first brew

To avoid raspiness, try not to steep the tea for longer than half a minute, at least at the beginning. After 3-4 brews, as the power of the tea subsides, feel free to extend the steeping time significantly to maintain the desired level of strength.

Note: hold the cake in one hand and snap off a piece of required size with the other. As you get closer to the middle of the cake where the density of pressed leaves is greater, you should a special puer knife, and awl or something similar to detach layers of tea horizontally.

Yubang yuannian chenxiang

Have you tried this tea? Do you have any comments? Please use the space below to share your thoughts and ask us questions.

  • Lasse Marhaug

    This the first time (to my knowledge) that I’d tasted a puer blended by two different crops. The description is accurate – it has a rich/full base and smooth aftertaste. I brewed it many times and it held up throughout the day. Absolutely recommended.

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