yunnan shu puer
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Yunnan Generic

Yunnan Wumingpai Shu Puer

10 €

A no-name cake that we are sourcing from a local tea grower. Despite its somewhat shaggy looks, this tea is packing an amazing load of natural sweetness and rich, pleasantly savory flavors characteristic of high-quality shu puers. Great value for money!

Out of stock

SKU: 0045. Categories: , , .

Additional Information

English name:

Yunnan Generic

Type and Grade:

7th grade shu (cooked, ripe, heavily fermented) puer.

Chinese:

云南无名牌熟普洱

Pinyin:

yúnnán wúmíngpái shúpǔ'ěr

Name origin:

Yunnan – province in China, Wumingpai – no-name in Chinese.

Ingredients:

Buds and leaves of Camellia sinensis.

Cake weight:

357 gr

Harvest year:

2008

Origin:

Yunnan, China

Steeping suggestions:

one serving: 6 grams (0.2 lb)
water: ~ 90 °C, 100-250 ml (~ 195°F, 3-9oz)
time: 30-180+ seconds
number of infusions: 6-8
discard the first brew

Packaging and storage:

We put all puer cakes into resealable plastic bags for extra protection. If stored in a cool and dry place, puer tea will remain drinkable for dozens of years.

Shipping:

Worldwide with Express Mail Service (EMS tracking) or China Post

Product Description

Yunnan Generic Shu Puer

A no-name cake that we are sourcing from a local tea grower. Despite its somewhat shaggy looks, this tea is packing an amazing load of natural sweetness and rich, pleasantly savory flavors characteristic of high-quality shu puers. Made with large-leaf maocha harvested and processed in 2006, this cooked puer will be of great value to hardened aficionados and tea initiates alike.

Why we like it?

This cake is an excellent example disproving one of the most recalcitrant stereotypes residing in the tea culture – that exceptional taste only comes with a high price tag. Despite the obvious features that came with its low-cost production, i.e. large and coarse leaves, occasional twigs and stalks, leaf fragments, and even some foreign objects, this cooked puer has fantastic taste and aromatic properties.

Roman’s personal score: 89/100
Miha’s personal score: 89/100

The scores above represent how the Daoli co-founders Miha and Roman feel about each particular tea. The ratings are given on 0 to 100 scale and are absolutely subjective. We simply translate into numbers our first impression about this tea.

General steeping suggestions

Tea can be steeped in a tea pot, gaiwan, or a strainer placed right in your cup. Feel free to experiment with time, temperature, and quantity. If tea feels a bit strong or bitter, just use less leaves or steep it for a shorter period of time.

The purpose of the first brew is to rinse the leaves, so it shouldn’t last more than five seconds and should be discarded. Pour the hot water again. This time, steep it for longer periods. Avoid leaving the leaves soaking in water between brews, because it makes tea taste bitter and steals a lot of its flavor. If used properly, about six grams of tea leaves can yield several middle-size cups of excellent tea.

Chinese people enjoy the original taste of tea, so they never use milk, sugar, or lemon.

Steeping suggestions for Shu Puer

Start with this, then experiment:

  • one serving: 6 grams (0.2 lb)
  • water: ~ 90 °C, 100-250 ml (~ 195°F, 3-9oz)
  • time: 30-180+ seconds
  • number of infusions: 6-8
  • discard the first brew

Start with 30 seconds; then increase steeping time gradually. Hypothetically, you could brew this tea for as long as you want. Although it won’t turn bitter, it will yield less brews. Keeping steeping time around one minute, you should be able to get 6-8 delicious infusions.

Note: hold the cake in one hand and snap off a piece of required size with the other. As you get closer to the middle of the cake where the density of pressed leaves is greater, you should a special puer knife, and awl or something similar to detach layers of tea horizontally.

Yunnan generic shu

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